Improve Your Vocabulary

Dear Parents,

      Your child builds his or her vocabulary by hearing new words on a regular basis.  When your child hears new words often, they lose their "newness" and become comfortable for him or her to say, write, and read.  A fun way to help your child learn new words is to have your family play Big Word of the Week.  Try it-in a (big) word, it's fantastic!

  1. Help your child think of a word he or she uses several times a day, such as tired, thirsty, bored, fun, or hungry.
  2. Think of a "big word" that means the same thing as the word your child chose, such as famished for hungry.
  3. Write the original word on a large piece of paper and draw an X through it.  Next to the original word, write the new word.
  4. Inform the family that, for a week, no one is allowed to say the original word (hungry).  Instead, they must replace it with the new word (famished).
  5. Have family members try to catch each other saying the banned word and then remind the rule-breaker of the new word.
  6. Invite your child to pick a new word each week.

Local Events

Dear Parents,

     When your child knows about global and local events, he or she learns about history, politics, and human nature at the same time.  To help your child focus on the positive side of human nature, discuss "good news" in news reports as often as "bad news." To get started, use Good News described below--it will help your child put the world’s events in perspective.

  1. Discuss the need for good news in today's news reports.
  2. With your child, read the headlines from word, national, and local news sections.
  3. Invite your child to circle each headline that gives good news, such as news of peace, a scientific breakthrough, or a successful event.
  4. Have your child choose these articles in which he or she is most interested.  Read the articles to your child and discuss them.
  5. Ask your child to choose his or her favorite article and explain why.
  6. Together, write a letter to the newspaper commending them for reporting good news.  Have your child refer to the article and tell why he or she liked it.
  7. Send the letter:  Explain that even if you do not receive a reply, you have learned something and promoted the reporting of good news.

Welcome

Welcome to the Third Grade.  I am really looking forward to working with you and your child. We have gotten off to a great start with the students learning class procedures, some review of what they learned last year, and the introduction of what we will be studying this year. I know this will be a wonderful and successful year for everyone, as love and respect are the words that will guide our behavior.

We have three simple rules:

1.  Respect God, yourself, others and things.

2.  Contribute to the learning environment.

3.  Follow classroom procedures.

Thanks again for a great beginning!

 

Sincerely, Michele Ward

 

Feast of Saint Blaise

The legend of his life that sprang up in the eighth century tell us that he was born in to a rich and noble family who raised him as a Christian. Blaise was a physician and after becoming a bishop, a new persecution of Christians began. He received a message from God to go into the hills to escape persecution. Men hunting in the mountains discovered a cave surrounded by wild animals who were sick. Among them Blaise walked  unafraid, curing them of their illnesses. Recognizing Blaise as a bishop, the hunters captured him to take him back for trial. On the way back, he talked a wolf into releasing a pig that belonged to a poor woman. Blaise  was sentenced to the same fate as John the Baptist.

Today the Church invites us to honor Saint Blaise, a Bishop in Armenia and martyred for the Faith in the year 316 A.D. The blessing of throats on his feast day is attributed to his healing of a young boy who was choking to death from a fish bone in his throat. While he was in prison and awaiting execution, the woman whose pig he saved came to visit him. She brought him some candles to brighten his dreary cell. And that's the origin of why we use the blessed candles in blessing throats on this feast day. 

This Feast provides us with the opportunity to speak briefly about “Sacramentals,” blessed objects that are used by the Church to remind us of the power and Providence of God in the lives of the faithful. They  remind us also of the intercession of Our Lady and the Saints.

However, it must be said from the outset that these Sacred Objects are not associated in any way with  magic nor superstition.  Among these Sacramentals are: blessed Ashes, Candles, Rosary Beads, Incense, blessed Oil, Palms, the Blessing of a Priest, the Crucifix and Holy Water. 

May we be grateful for these physical reminders of what is good and holy and thank God daily for His Providence. 

Blaise is the patron saint of wild animals because of his care for them and of those with illnesses of the throat. May we also protect the common good of wild animals and their habitats.

Prayer: May the intercession of St. Blaise, bishop and martyr, save you from every disease of the throat and every other ailment, in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and the Holy Spirit.  Amen. 

Third Grade

 Mrs. Ward's third grade class is off to an ambitious start. The goals of spirituality, academics, and environmental  responsibility are key to the success of our newyear. Since we have received our First Communion, we are now learning to strengthen our faith in our family, Church and here at St. Pius. We are developing our math skills in multiplication and division using various manipulatives, including dice. Parents, please help your child with these concepts. Our class is working hard to save our planet. We help by collecting the recycling boxes from each class to empty into the recycling bin out back. We also help by keeping the materials donated for recyling from taking over the parking lot! In case you didn't know, we collect aluminum, copy machine toner and ink cartridges, and clear plastic water bottles. Parents can deposit these items in the appropriate containers on the south
side of the rear drive. We are looking forward to a wonderful year!

 

 

      

 

 

 

 

 

 

November Fun!

 

We have had a great November so far!  Check out our slideshow to see how much fun we have had learning this month.

Math

Dear Parents,

What can be more exciting, stimulating and challenging than learning math?  Math helps us in everyday activities such as making a purchase to planning a party, from building a tree house to measuring a cup of cereal.  Work with your child on the activities that follow, and you find his or her math skills improve with time.  Keep in mind that your child will work at a level of his or her interest and ability.

  • When you make a trip to the grocery store for a few items, have your child add up the total bill.  Then tell your child that you plan to take back something that is spoiled.  Have him or her figure the bill without the extra item.
  • Cook up a storm! When baking brownies together, ask your child to measure the ingredients bofore adding them to the mixture.  Taste the yummy results!
  • Find four dice.  Make sure three look alike and one looks different-either in size or color.  Roll all four dice and see who gets the highest roll.  Do this several times, adding up all numbers and then finding the total.  Also roll all four dice, add up the three that are alike and then subtract the number on the die that is diffferent.  This is good practice for subraction.
  • Find a catalog and have your child pick three item she would like from the catalog.  Add them up and find the total amoutt to be paid.
  • Have your child add up the number of minutes he watches television each day.  Change the minutes to hours.  Create a list of the total minutes for all week.  How many hours does that make?
  • Explain coins-penies, nickels, dimes, and guarters.  When making  a simple purchase, get assistance from your child.
  • Fill a money bag with coins and ask your child to count and find out how much is in the bag.  If he or she guesses right, she or he gets to keep the money!
  • If you have a collection of something at home, like buttons or CDs, have your child count the total number in your collection.
  • Make up simple stories of addition, subtraction, and multiplication.  Allow you child time to think of the answer.  Make up simple stories having to do with time, too.
  • Write a number on a piece of paper. Then around the house or yard, find things that are exacttly  that number.  (Example five door knobs, 2 cars, six bicycles, etc.)

Whatever you do, instill a sense of self-confidence when your child answers correctly.  Make sure you apply the problems or story to something your child can relate and apply in the world..  The more comfortable your child is with numbers, time and measurements, the better he or she will become at math.  Be patient-if you want to see results-you will!

 

Homework Tips

 

Homework Tips

 

1.  Do your homework in the same place every time to help you stay organized.

2.  Keep a supply of paper, erasers, a ruler, a calculator, and scissors in your area.

3.  Think of a way to reward yourself when all of your homework is done, such as

going for a bike ride, watching a special show, or making a phone call.

4.  Take frequent but quick breaks.

5.  Get rid of whatever distracts you by either moving it or moving yourself.

6.  On a long-term assignment, do a little bit each night until it's due.

7.  Ask questions>  If something is tricky, ask for help.  If someone can't help you, make a note on your paper; and ask your teacher before handing it in.

Multiplication

Dear Parents,

      Memorizing multiplication facts makes many math activities easier and faster to do.  For example, when your child knows his or her math facts "by heart," he or she will be better at addition, division, and fractions.  The following furn, easy game will give your child practice with multiplication and help make it "stick."

1.  Place a set of dominoes face down on a table and mix them up.

2. Draw five pieces, and have your child do the same.

3.  To begin, have your child lay down any domino he or she chooses.

4.  Lay down one of your dominoes so an end of yours and an end of your child's adds up to five, such as: ( 3 and 2)  Or, lay down dominoes so ends have a product which is a multiple of five, such as: (3and 5)  Blank domino halves equal zero.

5.  If you cannot make five or a multiple of five, pick a domino from the pile until a play can be made.  (You must keep all the dominoes you cannot use.)

6.  Have your child take a turn and add a domino to make a sum or multiple of five.

7.  Continue to play until someone uses all of his or her dominoes.  If all the dominoes are chosen and you and your child still have some left over; add the dots in each person's set.  The person with the lowest dot total wins.

8.  After you play with multiples of five, try multiples of other numbers such as three, four, and six.

 

 

A "Funtastic" Fall Quarter

We have had a "funtastic" Fall quarter.  Check out the pictures and see for yourself.

Winter

 

Dear Parents,

          During the winter season, you may see frost.  You will also see bare trees and few animals or insects.  This is a good time for some indoor fun, it the weather is too cold or wet to play outside.  Try these activities.

  • Create a winter calendar.  Draw a weather symbol of sunshine, a cloud, rain or frost for each day of the month of December, January, and/or February.  If some days need more than one symbol, put as many on as needed.  Draw symbols in different colors and see how delightful and colorful the calendar becomes.
  • Make sugar cookies and decorate with powdered sugar.  Add raisin eyes, a red-hot cinnamon mouth and a thin black licorice scarf.
  • Color, cut, and paste!  Make holiday greeting cards for relatives and friends.  Send them out early.
  • Create a coupon book.  Have  your child make five coupons such:  as stay up 30 minutes later; watch one extra program on television, help make brownies and other things he or she wishes for and you approve.  After the coupons are written and colored, sign them and allow your child to use them whenever he or she wishes, especially during holiday time.
  • Make a bread snowflake.  Get one piece of white bread and cut out corners and inside shapes to create a unique shape.  Bake at a low temperature 10-20 minutes, until slightly brown.  Take out of oven and hang outside for birds.
  • Fill various size jars with jelly beans, gum balls and other small festive objects.  have your children guess how many are in each jar.  The one who comes closest gets the jar and its contents.  This makes a great party game.
  • Scavenger Hunt:  Write a note and hide it.  When your child finds the first note, have that note explain where to look for a second note.  When she or he finds the second note, it explains where to look for the third note...and so on. The final note should have a warm and speciial message.

 Have a fun winter!

 

semester pictures

Our field trip to Seward Farms

Welcome

Welcome to the fourth grade.  My name is Michelle Ward, and I will be your teacher.  This will be my fourteenth year at Saint Pius X School, and I am very excited about the upcoming year.  We will be exploring new topics and learning many new things.  I am really looking forward to meeting all of you.

Good News

Dear Parents,

     When your child knows about global and local events, he or she learns about history, politics, and human nature at the same time.  To help your child focus on the positive side of human nature, discuss "good news" in news reports as often as "bad news." To get started, use Good News described below--it will help your child put the world's events in perspective.

 

1.  Discuss the need for good news in today's news reports.

2.  With your child, read the headlines from word, national, and local news sections.

3.  Invite your child to circle each headline that gives good news, such as news of peace, a scientific breakthrough, or a successful event.

4.       Have your child choose these articles in which he or she is most interested.  Read the articles to your child and discuss them.

5.       Ask your child to choose his or her favorite article and explain why.

6.       Together, write a letter to the newspaper commending them for reporting good news.  Have your child refer to the article and tell why he or she liked it.

7.       Send the letter:  Explain that even if you do not receive a reply, you have learned something and promoted the reporting of good news.

 

Take Me Out to the Ball Game

As you can tell we all had fun at the BayBears game on Wednesday!

Earth's Changing Surface

Did You Know?

The earth's surface and it rocks are changing all the time.  We notice fast changes, such as those due to earthquakes and volcanoes, but are less likely to notice slow ones, such as those due to weathering and erosion.  Help your child understand one way the earth changes slowly by completing Crack Me Up-he or she will never look at rocks the same way again.

How You Can Help

1.  Give your child a jar.  Fill it to the top with water and tightly screw on the lid.

2.  Wrap a few sheets of paper towels around the jar, place the jar in a plastic bag, close the bag securely, and place it in the freezer.

3.  Wait until the water is frozen solid, and then help your child carefully unwrap the jar.

4.  Have your child examine the jar. It should be broken.)  Explain that the jar cracked because the water inside got bigger (expanded) as it froze.

5. Have your child imagine the jar is a large rock.  Explain that freezing water also causes big rocks to crack.  Each time cracks fill and freeze, rocks crack even more.  Over time rocks break apart and crumble.  A rock may take millions of years to break completely apart because of the earth’s varying weather.

 

Map Skills

Dear Parents,

 

Your community offers dozens of opportunities to teach your child social studies.

Local museums offer a glimpse into history.  Monuments and town squares help your child

understand the community’s roots.  Community maps help your child learn the concepts of

direction, size, and distance.  When using a local map, refer to Our Town described below.

It’ll help your child “find the way” to community understanding.

 

How You Can Help

 

  1. Obtain a detailed map of your community. (If you do not have one, ask your public librarian for one to copy.)  Make several copies to keep for later use.
  2. Mark your home on the map with your child.
  3. Mark other landmarks your child knows, such as his or her school, church, a shopping area, friends’ or relatives’ streets, or your work place.
  4. Trace routes you have taken together to reach the marked places.  Discuss landmarks seen along the way and the time each trip takes walking or by car.
  5. When tracing streets on the map, discuss significant street names such as those named after community leaders or founders.
  6. Keep another map in the car.  Each time you take a familiar or new route, invite your child to trace it with his or her finger on the map.

 

Earth's Layers

Did You Know?

The earth's surface and it rocks are changing all the time.  We notice fast changes, such as those due to earthquakes and volcanoes, but are less likely to notice slow ones, such as those due to weathering and erosion.  Help your child understand one way the eart changes slowily by ccompleting Crack Me Up-he or she will nerver look at rocks the same way again.

How You Can Help

1.  Give your child a jar.  Fill it to the top with water and tightly screw on the lid.

2.  Wrap a few sheets of paper towels around the jar, place the jar in a plastic bag, close the bag securely, and place it in the freezer.

3.  Wait until the water is frozen solid, and then help your child carefuly unwriap the jar.

4.  Have your child examine the jar,

Map Skills

Dear Parents,

 

       Your community offers dozens of opportunities to teach your child social studies.

Local museums offer a glimpse into history.  Monuments and town squares help your child understand the community’s roots.  Community maps help your child learn the concepts of direction, size, and distance.  When using a local map, refer to Our Town described below.  It’ll help your child “find the way” to community understanding.

 

How You Can Help

 

  1. Obtain a detailed map of your community. (If you do not have one, ask your public librarian for one to copy.)  Make several copies to keep for later use.
  2. Mark your home on the map with your child.
  3. Mark other landmarks your child knows, such as his or her school, church, a shopping area, friends’ or relatives’ streets, or your work place.
  4. Trace routes you have taken together to reach the marked places.  Discuss landmarks seen along the way and the time each trip takes walking or by car.
  5. When tracing streets on the map, discuss significant street names such as those named after community leaders or founders.
  6. Keep another map in the car.  Each time you take a familiar or new route, invite your child to trace it with his or her finger on the map.

 

 

School is Great FUN!